The Bioscan, 2 (4): 283-287, 2007
An International Quarterly Journal of Life Sciences
web site: www.thebioscan.in 
EVALUATION OF HEAVY METAL CONTENT IN PENNISETUM TYPHOIDES VAR. 
RAJ 171 AND ENVIRONMENT IN SANGANER AREA
RICHA MARWARI, MAYANKA KALA* AND T. I. KHAN
Indira Gandhi Centre for H.E.E.P.S.,
University of Rajasthan, Jaipur - 302 004, INDIA
E-mail: mayankakala@hotmail.com

KEY WORDS
Agricultural fields 
Textile waste water 
Heavy metals 
Pennisetum typhoides 
Human health







Received on: 11.03.2007

Accepted on: 18.06.2007



*Corresponding
 Author

ABSTRACT

The paper reveals results of a study carried out in agricultural fields of Sanganer town. This town is situated about 20kms away from the heart of Jaipur city. In the study area (Amanishah Nalla Sanganer, Jaipur) vegetables are grown in the fields receiving sewerage and textile wastewater. Water, soil and crop plants (samples) were collected from the agricultural fields of “Sanganer” for analysis. Waste water (from Amanishah Nalla) used as irrigation water in agricultural fields of Sanganer town was found to contain 2.117 mg/L of Zinc, 3.116 mg/L of Copper, 1.719 mg/L of Chromium and 2.119 mg/L of Lead as the highest amount of respective heavy metals. Soil from agricultural fields contained 11.213 mg/g of Zinc, 11.596 mg/g of Copper, 8.149 mg/g of Chromium and 6.645 mg/g of Lead. Pennisetum typhoides (plant material) grown in the study area was analyzed for heavy metal contents. Plant material (fruit) contained 12.339 mg/g of Zinc, 8.947 mg/g of Copper, 7.124 mg/g of Chromium and 2.050mg/g of Lead as the highest amount of heavy metals. Use of wastewater alters the nutritional value of the vegetables grown here and in long run consumption of such vegetables, which contain heavy metals, may impose health hazards in human beings. It is a matter of concern that related agencies are indifferent and do not bother about the presence of even carcinogenic metals like chromium in edible food. Wastewater is allowed to be used in agricultural fields of edible products. Time is ripe to stop this practice of using untreated wastewater in raising crop plants.