The Bioscan, 4(2): 203-207, 2009
An International Quarterly Journal of Life Sciences
web site: www.thebioscan.in 
LANGUAGE COMPREHENSION IN DOWN SYNDROME – A SPECIFIC 
LANGUAGE DEFICIT?
MARIA KAMMERER
6 Harvey Goodwin Avenue, Cambridge, CB4 3EU, UK
E-mail: maria.kammerer@gmail.com

KEY WORDS
Down Syndrome
Language
Comprehension
Binding Theory
Reflexivity
Received on: 07.01.2009 Accepted on: 18.04.2009

ABSTRACT

Language development, both productive and receptive, in Down Syndrome (DS) was long believed to be slower than that of ordinary children but that it essentially followed the same pattern as normal development (Fowler, 1990), with any further development of grammar being cut short at a certain point and vocabulary continuing to grow. Recent research has claimed that this is not the case and that an area where the language comprehension strategy of DS individuals differs from that of normal children has been identified (Perovic, 2002; Ring and Clahsen, 2005). This paper summarises the findings of a representative list of studies conducted on the topic of language comprehension in DS to form a comprehensive overview of what is already known at the moment and what developments are intended to be followed up in the future. This includes work by Chapman et al., (1991), Abbeduto et al., (2001, 2003), Laws and Bishop (2003), Perovic (2002), Ring and Clahsen (2005) and Laws and Gunn (2004) amongst others.